Climate Crisis

As the urgency of the climate crisis becomes increasingly apparent and concern deepens across all faith and belief communities about the scale of impending suffering and loss, and as Glasgow prepares to host the COP26 UN Climate Summit in November 2021, we have made facilitating interfaith engagement with the climate crisis a key priority of our work.

We know that faith communities have valuable resources to bring to bear when it comes to addressing the climate crisis constructively. People of faith have particular beliefs about why we should care about the climate crisis and can offer helpful perspectives on the root causes of the crisis and the spiritual transformation necessary for us to live with greater wisdom and compassion with respect to the environment.  Religions, moreover, have beneficial spiritual and pastoral resources to bring to bear when it comes to the potentially debilitating grief, anxiety, and despair many feel with respect to the climate crisis.  And, at a very practical level, faith communities have the power to motivate and mobilise large social networks so as to bring about effective action.

Climate Crisis

The scale of the climate crisis can seem overwhelming and it’s easy to feel powerless, so, at meetings and dialogue events we have been honing in on what we can do and, in particular, what we can do together, by reaching out across religious and cultural boundaries. We will continue to work to ensure that diverse voices are heard in the search for the solutions we so badly need.

With all this in mind, we have been engaging with wider civic society in Scotland through the COP26 Coalition, and with interfaith partners across the world, including the International Interfaith Liaison Committee to the UNFCCC.  We act as secretariat to the COP26 Interfaith Working Group, a Scotland based group of diverse faith-based organisations working to support each other’s climate activism and to build a coordinated interfaith response to COP26 and the climate emergency.